Learning Java
Java is not difficult, but there is a great deal to it. The language itself is fairly compact, but very powerful. To be able to program effectively in Java, however, you also need to understand the libraries that go with the language, and these are very extensive. In this book, the sequence in which you learn how the language works, and how you apply it, has been carefully structured so that you can gain expertise and confidence with programming in Java through a relatively easy and painless process. As far as possible, each chapter avoids the use of things you haven't learned about already. A consequence, though, is that you won't be writing Java applications with a graphical user interface right away. While it may be an appealing idea, this would be a bit like learning to swim by jumping in the pool at the deep end. Generally speaking, there is good evidence that by starting in the shallow end of the pool and learning how to float before you try to swim, the chance of drowning is minimized, and there is a high expectation that you will end up a competent swimmer.

Java Programs
As we have already noted, there are two kinds of programs you can write in Java. Programs that are to be embedded in a web page are called Java applets, and normal standalone programs are called Java applications. You can further subdivide Java applications into console applications, which only support character output to your computer screen (to the command line on a PC under Windows, for example), and windowed Java applications that can create and manage multiple windows. The latter use the typical graphical user interface (GUI) mechanisms of window-based programs - menus, toolbars, dialogs and so on.

While we are learning the Java language basics, we will be using console applications as examples to illustrate how things work. These are application that use simple command line input and output. With this approach we can concentrate on understanding the specifics of the language, without worrying about any of the complexity involved in creating and managing windows. Once we are comfortable with using all the features of the Java language, we'll move on to windowed applications and applet examples.

Learning Java - the Road Ahead
Before starting out, it is always helpful to have an idea of where you are heading and what route you should take, so let's take a look at a brief road map of where you will be going with Java. There are five broad stages you will progress through in learning Java using this book:

The first stage is this chapter. It sets out some fundamental ideas about the structure of Java programs and how they work. This includes such things as what object-oriented programming is all about, and how an executable program is created from a Java source file. Getting these concepts straight at the outset will make learning to write Java programs that much easier for you.

Next you will learn how statements are put together, what facilities you have for storing basic data in a program, how you perform calculations and how you make decisions based on the results of them. These are the nuts and bolts you need for the next stages.

In the third stage you will learn about classes - how you define them and how you can use them. This is where you learn the object-oriented characteristics of the language. By the time you are through this stage you will have learned all the basics of how the Java language works so you will be ready to progress further into how you can use it.

In the fourth stage, you will learn how you can segment the activities that your programs carry out into separate tasks that can execute concurrently. This is particularly important for when you want to include several applets in a web page, and you don't want one applet to have to wait for another to finish executing before it can start. You may want a fancy animation to continue running while you play a game, for example, with both programs sitting in the same web page.

In the fifth stage you will learn in detail how you implement an application or an applet with a graphical user interface, and how you handle interactions with the user in this context. This amounts to applying the capabilities provided by the Java class libraries. When you finish this stage you will be equipped to write your own fully-fledged applications and applets in Java. At the end of the book, you should be a knowledgeable Java programmer. The rest is down to experience.

Throughout this book we will be using complete examples to explore how Java works. You should create and run all of the examples, even the simplest, preferably by typing them in yourself. Don't be afraid to experiment with them. If there is anything you are not quite clear on, try changing an example around to see what happens, or better still - write an example of your own. If you are uncertain how some aspect of Java that you have already covered works, don't look it up right away - try it out. Making mistakes is a great way to learn.
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