It's me the newbie

Posted by: Xxlink64

It's me the newbie - 05/02/02 05:43 AM

Wow, you guys really had some nices **** to say didn't you. Thanks for all the replies too. Ok now I have decided that I would like to start hacking. But now what. I need some help on where to start. Alot of things say I need linux, but if i get linux I'm gonna need to buy a modem. And I can't right now. But if anybody has any suggestions please let me no.
Posted by: loanbanker

Re: It's me the newbie - 05/02/02 08:23 AM

I know first hand if your just getting into linux then buying a modem to hack should be about the last of your concerns. Theres a huge learning curve.
Posted by: Moffesto

Re: It's me the newbie - 05/03/02 07:35 PM

Totally, Ive been reading for years and still i've just begun in understanding, im also a slow learner to, lol
Posted by: Le4rner

Re: It's me the newbie - 05/03/02 09:56 PM

Hey I'm Learner.. A crash coarse in Linux for ya buddy.


Linux keeps files in a single hierarchical directory structure, that (behind the scenes) is made up of a combination of hard drives, CD-ROMs, floppy disks, ZIP drives, etc.


The typical Linux filesystem looks like this:


/
|- bin >>>===========>Essential programs (or binaries)
|- boot >>>===========>startup (or boot) information
|- dev >>>===========> Devices
|- etc >>>==========>Configuration files
|- home >>>==========>Users' home directories
| |- user1
| |- user2
| |- user3
|
|- lib >>>==========>System libraries and other various program files
|- lost+found >>>======> Files recovered after filesystem checks
|- mnt >>>==========> Mount point for removable disks
| |- cdrom >>>==========> (An alternative is /cdrom and /floppy)
| |- floppy
|
|- proc >>>=============>A special directory with file-based system information
|- root >>>=============>Home directory for the root user
|- sbin >>>============> Essential system programs
|- tmp >>>===========>Temporary work space
|- usr
| |- X11R6 >>>========> X-Windows files
| | |- bin >>>===========> X-Windows programs
| | |- include
| | |- lib
| | |- man
| | |- share
| |
| |- bin >>>============> General programs
| |- dict >>>============> Dictionary
| |- doc >>>============> Documentation
| |
| |- etc >>>============> Additional configuration files
| |- include >>>==========> Include files for the C preprocessor
| |- info >>>===========> GNU info files
| |- lib >>>===========>Additional libraries
| |- local >>>===========>Files generally not supplied by the distribution
| | |- bin
| | |- doc
| | |- etc
| | |- include
| | |- lib
| | |- man
| | |- sbin
| | |- share
| |
| |- man >>>============>Man (ie. user manual) pages
| |- share >>>=============>Files that can be shared between computers of different architectures
| |- sbin >>>=============>Additional system programs
| |- src >>>===========>Source code directories (eg. /usr/src/linux/)
|
|- var
|- lock >>>===========>Lock files
|- log >>>===========> Log files (system messages, error logs, etc.)
|- spool >>>==========> Spool files
|- mail >>>==========> Users' mailbox files

Here is a list of some basic Commands.







ls
List the contents of the current directory. kinda like "dir" in MS DOS.


ls name
List the contents of the named directory (eg. ls /etc)


ls -l
List the directory contents in "long" format, including file permissions, ownership details and file size


ls -a
List all the files in a directory, including files that start with a '.'


cat filename
Display the contents of a file to the screen


more filename
Display a file on the screen, with scrolling and search facilities. less is an enhanced version of more


cp source destination
Copy the source file to the destination (eg. cp /etc/passwd . copies the password file to the current directory)


mv source destination
Move (or rename) the source file to the destination, which can be a directory or another file


rm filename
Remove (ie. delete) a file - use with caution!


mkdir name
Make a directory


rmdir name
Remove an empty directory


locate keyword
Displays a list of files that contain the keyword in their filename.


su
Temporarily become the superuser - useful for system administration tasks (can also be used to become another user - see the man page for further information)


passwd
Change the password used to access your user account


who
Display a list of users currently logged onto this computer


Getting help about commands



Linux has two on-line documentation systems: man and info. There is a man page for every command on the system, while info is normally used to document applications from the Free Software Foundation, such as EMACS (a text editor) and gcc (a C compiler for programming).




man command

Display a manual page for the specified command. The "man" page provides a brief explanation about the command, possible options and switches and detailed information about using the command


apropos keyword

Displays a list of man pages that contain information about the supplied keyword



Shutting down a Linux computer(If you in the tex mode that is)


A Linux computer needs to be turned off correctly, to ensure that files are correctly written to the hard drive, and that programs are closed properly.


Reboot the computer
/sbin/shutdown -r now


Shutdown (halt) the computer
/sbin/shutdown -h now


Reboot the computer
Press Control-Alt-Delete


When the shutdown command starts, it will display information as each step of the shutdown sequence is completed, until the computer finally displays:


The system is halted


in which case you can turn off the computer, or


Please stand by while rebooting the system...


for a computer that is being rebooted


Meet bash



Good news: with Linux you type much less at the prompt, because the bash shell types for you whenever possible, and features cool line editing capabilities. To begin with, the arrow-up key recalls previous command lines; but there's more. Pressing completes file and directory names, so typing


$ ls /uTABloTABbTAB

is like typing


$ ls /usr/local/bin

If there were ambiguities, as typing


$ ls /uTABloTABiTAB

bash stops because it doesn't know if you mean /usr/local/info or /usr/local/include. Supply more characters then press again.

Other useful key presses are that deletes a word to the left, while deletes a word to the right; moves the cursor one word to the right, to the left; moves to the beginning of the line, to the end. The key is equivalent to .

Enough for now. Once you get used to these shortcuts, you'll find the DOS prompt very annoying..

If you read all that.... You should know, That is the start.
Posted by: Le4rner

Re: It's me the newbie - 05/03/02 09:57 PM

http://www.linuxnewbie.org./ >>>=======> This is a great site to answer many of your questions with how to get started, and why your system might be doing whatever it is doing.
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* http://www.linuxiso.org/ >>>========> Awsome site to download a free version of LINUX, They have Mandrake, Correl, and many others. Just download your self a copy, and see me with any questions.
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* http://www.linuxstart.com/ >>>========>Another great site for answering many questions you'll have!
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* http://www.linux.org/lessons/ >>>========> This was my favorite site. It is a tutorial wich breaks every thing down in basic english.
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* http://www.linux.box.sk/ >>>======> Never been here myself, but it comes highly recomended.
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* http://www.linmodems.org >>>======> Having problems with a win modem? Try this site to see if they have a driver for your modem.
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howto.tucows.com/otherhowto/ >>>======> A list of very detailed how to files on Linux. I was very impressed.
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* http://howto.tucows.com/man/man1/index.html >>>======> A list of user commands and detailed explanation of how to use them!
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* http://freshmeat.net/ >>>======>get the latest applications in the GNU/Linux world at this site.
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* http://www.linuxnewbie.org/cgi-b...matebb.cgi >>>=======> A complete forum dealing with Linux Problems and resolutions.
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* http://www.linuxprinting.org/ >>>========> If you are haveing trouble with your printer, this site have printer drivers and helpful reading material.
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http://www.linux-usb.org/ >>>=========> Having problems useing your USB devices? This site is the home of the Linux USB Project!
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http://www.linux-laptop.net/ >>>============> So you wana switch to linux for your laptop? Might wana check this first.
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http://www.redhat.com/ >>>===========> This list wouldn't be complete without mentioning these guys!
Posted by: sinetific

Re: It's me the newbie - 05/03/02 10:46 PM

you dont NEED linux. Its just another operating system thats out there that some people choose to use but a lot of "hackers" use windows its not about what OS you run or what kind of hardware you have that will make you a hacker.I suggest reading as many manuals and technical information about the things you want to learn about then youll realize its just knowledge that makes you able to hack not an OS.
Posted by: ?

Re: It's me the newbie - 05/04/02 12:13 AM

it used to be that only linux had raw socket support so linux had better tools like port-scanners and sniffers but now with XP out it won't be long before nmap, nessus, etc are ported or XP-specific applications are made. the reason why I like using linux is the power of the command line, the scripting abbilities, and the tools that come with it. once you get the hang of it you can 10xs more productive than in windows.
Posted by: Gremelin

Re: It's me the newbie - 05/04/02 10:59 AM

I use windows 98se but i also have about 60 shells, and about 25 roots hehe..