vmware

Posted by: andySF

vmware - 01/22/05 09:37 PM

i can change the vmware bios file?
Posted by: UndeadBob

Re: vmware - 01/23/05 02:09 AM

wow you can actually do something.....

what do you want. a medal!!!!
Posted by: andySF

Re: vmware - 01/23/05 06:36 AM

whatever...
can i change the vmware bios ---> ? <----- that is a question !!!!
Posted by: Gremelin

Re: vmware - 01/23/05 08:19 AM

Quote:
i can change the vmware bios file?
statement, rephraise in the form of a question.
Posted by: Infinite

Re: vmware - 01/23/05 08:20 AM

there is no bios in vmware...
Posted by: Chem

Re: vmware - 02/17/05 04:17 AM

Quote:
Originally posted by Infinite:
there is no bios in vmware...
While you may be right that there isn't a bios "file", there's most definitely a custom VMware bios, designed to give fake system resources that are later emulated by VMware for the emulated (guest?) operating system.

I'm pretty sure the fake bios is generated each time VMware boots up a virtual machine, which is altered by the virtual machine settings (ammount of system memory, emulated scuzzy controllers, etc).
The guest operating system can actually snarf the bios to gain system information.

To answer your question, no.
Changing the generated bios with another one would be retarded and do nothing but cause VMware to crash when it tries to boot up.
Posted by: Nexus

Re: vmware - 03/23/05 08:59 PM

Quote:
Originally posted by Chem:
To answer your question, no.
Changing the generated bios with another one would be retarded and do nothing but cause VMware to crash when it tries to boot up. [/QB]
You can't change the BIOS version itself as that's a VMWare specific one, but you can change the BIOS settings. The current setting are saved in a binary file called 'nvram' in your guest OS directory and you cannot edit this directly.
Hit F2 on guest OS boot and make any BIOS changes you want, such a boot device order or whatever, then exit saving changes and these changes are saved in the 'nvram' file and will persist across reboots and shutdowns for that guest OS. So it does act like a real BIOS in that way.